‘Christopher Robin’ Review: Out of the (Hundred Acre) Woods

 

Disney continues to move forward with live adaptations of their most famous animated tales. It worked well with last year’s Beauty and the Beast and they hit the big time yet again with a charming, sophisticated adaption of A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh.

Christopher Robin follows the titular character as he tries to navigate his professional life that has come to overshadow his family. It takes a visit from a few old friends from the Hundred Acre Wood (Winnie the Pooh and co.) to help him begin to see what truly matters in life.

The film itself is centered on the idea of a loss of innocence and how to regain that childlike wonder that you have as a kid. As an adult, Christopher Robin (played brilliantly by Ewan McGregor) has become a more hardened serious adult instead of the imaginative child he was in his early years. As we go throughout the story, it’s clear that Pooh and his friends are what helped Christopher stay in his youth. When Pooh shows up again, Christopher slowly gets his ability to play and have fun and genuinely enjoy his life again.

The movie is genuinely hilarious. Eeyore’s self-deprecating humor will always leave me laughing, while Pooh’s awkward yet well delivered unintentional jokes make for a good chuckle as well. It also contains plenty of moments that could have you grabbing for a tissue to wipe your tears. It really plays with your emotions.

The score is memorable and subtle. The cinematography is gorgeous and the Ashdown Forest of Sussex, England seems like the perfect stage for the Hundred Acre Wood. The movie is technically the total package. My only gripes were small things in the script, but as its a kids’ movie for the most part, the films gets somewhat of a pass.
Christopher Robin is a stellar movie. Whether you’re young and just now experiencing A.A. Milne’s fantastic characters or you’re rediscovering the magic after long years without these characters, it’s a beautiful story that will leave you happy and waiting for a sequel.

Rating

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